Too young to retire, too old to be hired – the 50+ employment paradox

Meet the paradox This month the state retirement age for men and women was unified at 65. It will move to 68 by 2039. The ‘ageing’ of the state retirement age clearly indicates the expectation by the state that people will work for longer. Given the recent increases in longevity, this would appear a reasonable expectation. However, the rate of population ageing is slowing. And many people are uncertain if they could work through to state retirement age in their current occupations – the fear of ‘working until you drop’. But the even bigger problem is that employers haven’t caught...

Let’s talk about retirement

‘Do Not Go Gentle’ This week’s British Society of Gerontology Conference at Swansea was entitled ‘Do Not Go Gentle’, a sentiment absolutely encapsulated by the WASPI (Women Against State Pension Inequality) women who also this week took such exception, quite righty, to the advice of Pensions Minister, Guy Opperman MP that women who had been caught out by changes to SPA should start an apprenticeship (report here). For WASPI, the complaint is that they have not been given equal time to men to make adjustments to compensate for the pension reforms – which they support. They recognise that reform is...

Children – the best and worst thing I ever did

This wasn’t the blog I was expecting to write, being in the middle of new research on economic productivity of older workers (see here). And I rather expect to be following the proverbial lemming over the cliff given the controversial position of the issues involved. But here goes: Children – the best and worst thing I ever did. Why this topic now? I took a 15 minute break this morning and caught the broadcast of a Helen Simpson short story, ‘Café Society’ (see here); a biting commentary on the impact of motherhood on the careers of women. And it brought...

Older workers are productive and effective – making the case for the 50+ employee

The statistics show that many in the 50-retirement generation find it difficult to find work and progress their careers. But in fact older workers are productive and effective – they have unique abilities and strengths which make them a real asset in the workplace. And there is strong evidence to support employing older workers too. In this blog, New Middle Age takes a look at the Unique Selling Points of older workers. Our 50s may be our most productive decade at work It may be a surprise, but there is good evidence that economic productivity at work peaks in our 50s....

ILC-UK/renEWL/Uncertain Futures conference ‘Overcoming Inequalities: Addressing barriers to extending working lives’

Yesterday, Angela was pleased to be able to attend the ILC-UK/renEWL/Uncertain Futures conference ‘Overcoming Inequalities: Addressing barriers to extending working lives’. The day included presentations from a large and impressive line-up of speakers, from the research project team, employer and third sector representatives and including a personal review of his last year’s work by John Cridland. Here she picks out some of the key issues. Structural inequalities Health and socio-economic inequalities, as well as ethnic and family structures, underpin many of the inequalities observed in achieving extended working lives. And the foundations for these inequalities are likely to have been...

Meet New Middle Age – an effective, productive and vital resource.

Government estimates indicate that one in four of us currently in our 50s can realistically expect to live to 100. With this in mind it is essential that we stop seeing 50 as old or older. It makes no more sense to think about 50 or 60 year olds together with people of 80, 90 or above than doing so with young people thirty or forty years their junior. 50 is in reality the start of the lifetime second half. A new identity and a new image is called for. Meet New Middle Age, the generation from 50 to retirement – whenever that might be given the abolition of a...